5 Ways to Keep Your Bones Healthy as You Age

Exercise

Skeletal system is the body's structural marvel that continuously remodels throughout your life! Bone function is based on a simple principle - use it or lose it! Weight-bearing physical activity (such as walking, dancing, or climbing) supports new bone tissue formation, making bones stronger and functional.

Exercise is among the key decisive factors that influence bone health by preserving bone mass and strength, prevent death of bone cells and provide a long-term anti-aging protection [Naidu 2009, Santos et al 2017].

Falls are a serious problem for the elderly. Balance training (such as yoga) and tai chi have been shown to decrease falls by 47% and reduce the risk of hip fracture by approximately 25% [American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons].

Falls are a serious problem for the elderly. Balance training (such as yoga) and tai chi have been shown to decrease falls by 47% and reduce the risk of hip fracture by approximately 25% [American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons].

Nutrition

The bone is a 'mineral bank' and those minerals come from your diet. Studies show that vitamins, minerals, nutrients and dietary practices play an important role in skeletal health. This includes a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, seafood, dairy products, and beverages in moderation [Sahni et al 2015].

When it comes to dietary practices for senior adults, in particular, making sure that the bones are receiving adequate nutritional support will be highly beneficial. Certain nutritional imbalances, such as inadequate or excess calcium, can cause bone problems.

Phytates are plant-based chemicals that interfere with your body’s ability to absorb the calcium. Certain foods like beans naturally contain phytates. You can reduce the phytate level by soaking beans in water for several hours prior to cooking them [National Osteoporosis Foundation].

Phytates are plant-based chemicals that interfere with your body’s ability to absorb the calcium. Certain foods like beans naturally contain phytates. You can reduce the phytate level by soaking beans in water for several hours prior to cooking [Source: National Osteoporosis Foundation].

Weight Management

Bones provide structure and allow for movement, but they also bear weight. As a result, the comfort and condition of your skeletal system is often dependent on the stress put on your bones and joints. Extra weight can negatively impact the skeletal frame. However, obesity and caloric restriction can increase fracture risk, which are regulated by endocrine factors (i.e. hormones) and cytokines that affects bone and calcium absorption [Shapses & Sukumar 2012].

Maintaining a healthy weight and avoiding obesity is one of the best ways to help keep your bones strong and prevent bone and joint issues or aggravating any pre-existing conditions.

Those that are obese or extremely underweight during adolescence (a critical period for bone development) may develop permanent bone loss [Radiological Society of North America; National Institute of Health].

Those that are obese or extremely underweight during adolescence (a critical period for bone development) may develop permanent bone loss [Radiological Society of North America; National Institute of Health].

Wellness Checkups

Bone mass typically peaks for most people during the third decade of life [Naidu 2009]. Your doctor can help you by keeping you aware of what influences bone health; identifying if you’re at risk of bone disease; and providing lifestyle and therapeutic interventions to prevent bone loss and fractures. How often should you be getting a check-up?

  • Ages 30 or younger: every 2-3 years get a physical
  • Ages 30-40: every 1 year get a physical
  • 50+: physicals become much more important and should be done at least once a year

Arms are among the most commonly broken bones, accounting for almost half of all adults' fractures. The collar-bone is the most commonly broken bone among children [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center].

Arms are among the most commonly broken bones, accounting for almost half of all adults' fractures. The collar-bone is the most commonly broken bone among children. [Source: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center].

Add Bone & Joint Supplement

While a supplement is not a treatment or cure for any bone and joint disorders, it can be helpful in providing nutrients to support your bone and joints. It is estimated that 31% of U.S. adults aged 55+ take dietary supplements for bone health [Council for Responsible Nutrition, 2018 Survey on Dietary Supplements]. In the case of athletes or for women taking part in regular physical activity during peri-menopause or post-menopause, recent research has found that taking nutritional supplements in addition to exercise can reduce bone loss and potentially increase bone mass in this at-risk population [Naidu 2009, Lorincz et al 2009].

For bone health supplementation, OsteoDenx® is definitely a good option to consider. OsteoDenx® is distinct from other generic vitamin or supplements because it actually helps support the body’s own process of forming new bone and lubricating joints. In complementing this natural building and repair process, OsteoDenx® can help promote strong, healthy bones and joints throughout life. Learn more about OsteoDenx® here.

References:
 
[1] Naidu AS (2009) Bio-replenishment for Bone Health. California: Bio-Rep Media. ISBN:978-0982445105
[2] Lorincz C et al (2009) Bone health Part-1: Nutrition. Sports Health 1(3):253-260. doi:10.1177/1941738109334213
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3445243/
[3] Office of the Surgeon General (US) (2004) Bone Health and Osteoporosis: A Report of the Surgeon General. Rockville (MD). Putting It All Together for the Busy Health Care Professional. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK45516/
[4] Sahni S et al (2015) Dietary Approaches for Bone Health: Lessons from the Framingham Osteoporosis Study. Current Osteoporosis Reports 13(4): 245-255. doi:10.1007/s11914-015-0272-1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4928581/
[5] Santos L et al (2017) Exercise and bone health across the lifespan. Biogerontology 18(6):931-946. doi:10.1007/s10522-017-9732-6.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5684300/
[6] Shapses SA, Sukumar D (2012) Bone metabolism in obesity and weight loss. Annual review of Nutrition 32:287-309. doi:10.1146/annurev.nutr.012809.104655. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4016236/

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Bevi Edlund brings over ten years of journalism experience to bioQuad. She graduated from California State University, Fullerton with a degree in Communications (where she majored in Journalism). Bevi is passionate about writing about nutrition, health and lifestyle. Prior to joining the bioQuad team, Bevi had experience writing for various newspapers throughout Southern California. Bevi loves to connect with people through her blogs posts and articles.